2002 – Rote Fabrik

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At Rote Fabrik

4th April 2002 – Rote Fabrik, Zürich, CH

Set List

  1. Anarcadia: All Horned Animals
  2. Amethyst Deceivers (Version 2)
  3. Slur
  4. A Cold Cell
  5. Broccoli (Version 1)
  6. Paranoid Inlay
  7. A.Y.O.R.
  8. Backwards

Background

Feeling: Reflective

“Backwards / The Remote Viewer” phase.

For years, only backstage footage, officially uploaded to Vimeo by Black Sun Productions, was available. Finally, on September 16th, 2016, Pierce Wyss and Massimo Villani, in conjunction with Claus Laufenburg, posted the full recording of the gig to Youtube.

This was Massimo’s first show with Coil and the first where he and Pierce did their “ghost boys” routine. Their choreography is quite nascent, here. Sometime during Massimo and Pierce’s involvement with Coil, they developed a polygamous love affair with John and Peter. From Wikipedia, citing sources from old, sadly unsaved anarcocks.com webpages: “Self-described ‘artivists,’ Massimo and Pierce, met on October 26, 2001 on the set of an underground pornographic film in which both were performing. The pair, who had both worked as male sex-workers since their teens, formed a romantic and artistic relationship which culminated into the formation of the queer, post-industrial Black Sun Productions collective…Massimo and Pierce had previously been well known as artists in Switzerland and Italy; however, in 2002, the pair gained international attention when their ritual performance piece, Plastic Spider Thing, was included in industrial band Coil’s European and Scandinavian tour. Black Sun Productions explained Plastic Spider Thing as ‘A highly moral, yet sexually explicit exploration into the relationship between the spider and the fly,’ whilst Brainwashed.com described the performance as ‘The sex act turned into a sadomasochistic, predatory dance of sorts.’

Plastic Spider Thing included performance art from Massimo and Pierce, accompanied by loops and fragments of numerous Coil works that created a multi-layered electronic ‘dronewerk’, created by the third member of the Black Sun Productions artistic collective, DraZen. Coil members Jhonn Balance and Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson were introduced to Plastic Spider Thing while receiving a demonstration of various pieces of bondage paraphernalia at a private ceremony at Massimo and Pierce’s fetish club in Zürich, Switzerland. Balance and Christopherson, who were impressed by Black Sun Productions, signed the group to Coil’s Eskaton label and subsequently invited the collective to support their 2002 tour.” Massimo and Pierce performed at this gig and the next, but did not entirely join the 2002 tour until 2002-06-07 Den Haag. DraZen accompanied Massimo and Pierce and filmed many Coil concerts.

John growls into the mic towards the end of “Anarcadia: All Horned Animals,” and after the song, he says, “Anarcadia, Anarcadia, Anarcadia…’Amethyst Deceivers.’” This is the only time I know of where John namechecks this title for the song; at the previous gig, he called it “Queer Wolf.” It’s possible this gig is where the official name change took place.

Before “Slur,” John says, “That song was about the cockatiels, the strange birds that control time and space.” One would think that the birds in question would be “vultures,” since they are namechecked in the actual song, but John often mixed up the birds. He continues, “This next song is called ‘Slur’ and dedicating it to Antony of Antony and the Johnsons, a wonderful, wonderful person whom you must see live if you can.” This was the only time I know of where he dedicated the song to Antony.

Before “A Cold Cell,” John says, “This next song is ‘A Cold Cell,’ and it’s dedicated to all the prisoners in the world. Uh, this is prisoners in real prisons, prisoners of their own conscience, prisoners of conscience, prisoners who are trapped in their own…prisons of their own making, in their own minds. ‘A Cold Cell.’” Peter probably thought John was rambling so he started the track midway through John’s spiel.

Before “Broccoli,” John says, “The next song is called ‘Broccoli.’ Moon musick, moon musick…music to play in the dark.” As the song commences, he continues, “And I urge each and every one of you to start your own compost heap. For the produce, the renewal, decay, and regrowth could be at your personal finger tips, in your own personal gardens, inside your head and in real soil in gardens.”

Before “Paranoid Inlay,” John says, “Uh, the next song is ‘Paranoid Inlay.’” Some in the audience loudly sneezes. “…which is about the malice contained within inanimate objects.”

Before “A.Y.O.R.,” John says, “Uh-huh. Thank you. Uh huh huh huh.” As the song commences, he continues, “The next song is called ‘At Your Own Risk,’ ‘At Your Own Risk.’”

Before “Backwards” and as it starts up, John says, “Uh, thank you. The next song, uh, is taken from a book I stole from the Pope’s secret library. There’s some good lyrics in there. We went to the Cabaret Voltaire, today, and I think everyone should be aware that it’s changing psychic words (?), so reclaim the Cabaret Voltaire, I say. Reclaim the Cabaret Voltaire!” After the song, John concludes, “Thank you, thank you, and good night, thank you.”

Gig Review(s)

Below is a review of this gig (original text in German, which can be found here):

Coil in the red factory
incantation
6.4.2002

The scales finally stopped in the face of irritation and irritation. And obviously intoxicated with aesthetic shock and confusion – should one now laugh or pray? -, the audience in the Red Factory almost forgot the final applause.

The scales finally stopped in the face of irritation and irritation. And obviously intoxicated with aesthetic shock and confusion – should one now laugh or pray? -, the audience in the Red Factory almost forgot the final applause. Only minutes after the cult performance of the English band Coil had culminated in the final of the noise and the apocalyptic light-ballet, some enthusiasm was thrown back to the stage, which was, of course, orphaned. The three musicians had never looked back in the wrong nebula from which, dressed in white shirts and overskirts, accompanied by stomping basses, menacing noise, and throbbing voices, had danced a good hour before. There were also two naked, pointed Iroquois, who were absorbed in a slowly twisted dance before a distorted mirror.

So short the performance, so lush the sound plot, which illustrated in its theatrical and dynamic design the long way the coil has gone. John Balance, who now spoke, preached or bellowed his lyrics, had founded the band in 1983. Later, Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson, who was now working on a sleek laptop in the background, had joined in. Influenced initially by the dark, hard aesthetics of Industrial and Gothic, the musicians were inspired by House and Acid in the late 1980s to electronic experiments and the play with spoiled tape. Today, they are often regarded as pioneers of the electro-avant-garde, but the Zürich concerto proved that Coil paid tribute to a different spirit from the children of the nineties. They are not hedonists, and God is not a DJ for them. Rather, they cultivate a kind of musical animism. In concert, the sound and rhythmic force of the electronics, supplemented by acoustic sounds of bells and shawls, often contradicted the thrifty and awkward movements of the musicians. Rather angry priests as sovereign artists, they seemed to conjure more than dominate the music. In the midst of the tracks, which alternated between rhythmic staccato and rambling, floating loops, the music could be combined by bar and text, but in the marginal zones of the compositions, the sound was free in exuberant fiddling and gurgling, clapping and rippling, thunder And snorting. Which was supplemented by acoustic sounds of bells and shawls, often contradicted the thrifty and awkward movements of the musicians. Rather angry priests as sovereign artists, they seemed to conjure more than dominate the music. In the midst of the tracks, which alternated between rhythmic staccato and rambling, floating loops, the music could be combined by bar and text, but in the marginal zones of the compositions, the sound was free in exuberant fiddling and gurgling, clapping and rippling, thunder And snorting. Which was supplemented by acoustic sounds of bells and shawls, often contradicted the thrifty and awkward movements of the musicians. Rather angry priests as sovereign artists, they seemed to conjure more than dominate the music. In the midst of the tracks, which alternated between rhythmic staccato and rambling, floating loops, the music could be combined by bar and text, but in the marginal zones of the compositions, the sound was free in exuberant fiddling and gurgling, clapping and rippling, thunder And snorting.

DISPLAY

InRead invented by Teads

The music, coined by mandala-like or documentary visuals, proved to Coil as a religious animistic power, which on the one hand enables sensory marginal experiences, but on the other hand can also intensify the thrust of political engagement – whether it is the fight for the rights of prisoners or the For the preservation of a Zürich Dada house.

Ueli Bernays

Zürich, Red Factory, April 4th.

Line-up

John Balance – bells on “Anarcadia: All Horned Animals”.
Peter “Sleazy” Christopherson.
Simon Norris (Ossian Brown) – bells on “Anarcadia: All Horned Animals”.
Cliff Stapleton – hurdy-gurdy.
Mike York – Breton bagpipes, bombarde on “Anarcadia: All Horned Animals,” balalaika on “Broccoli” and “Paranoid Inlay”.
Massimo Villani – performer.
Pierce Wyss – performer.

Backstage or Related Promo Material

Ticket Stubs

Please contact us if you have any ticket stubs from this event: info@live-coil-archive.com

Venue

Rote Fabrik
Seestrasse 395
Postfach 1073
8038 Zürich

Gallery

Known Recordings

Tapes owners/taper:

AMT – DraZen

Concert Recording Downloads